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Meng defence argues document disclosure wouldn't harm Canada's national security

Last Updated Jul 27, 2020 at 12:30 pm MDT

Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, leaves her home to go to B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, Wednesday, January 22, 2020. Lawyers for a Huawei executive facing possible extradition to the United States are disputing the Canadian government's claim that it can't release some documents in the case because it would compromise national security. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

OTTAWA — Lawyers for a Huawei executive facing possible extradition to the United States are disputing the Canadian government’s claim that it can’t release some documents in the case because it would compromise national security.

Meng Wanzhou is wanted on fraud charges in New York, but she denies the allegations against her.

During a virtual hearing at Ottawa’s Federal Court, defence lawyer Ian Carter questioned how releasing the documents could hurt Canada’s relations with China any more than an already public affidavit.

He says the affidavit by Global Affairs Canada’s director general in South Asia alleges that China regularly seeks to blame foreign governments for the consequences of its actions.

Carter also says the Federal Bureau of Investigations in the United States wouldn’t expect any of its correspondences to remain confidential because it is a law enforcement agency, not an intelligence service.

Robert Frater, a lawyer representing Canada’s attorney general in the case, told the judge the defence team is making “abstract” arguments because they haven’t seen the documents and said he would make proper arguments in hearings closed to the public.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 27, 2020.

 

The Canadian Press