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#MeToo on the track: Abuse allegations embolden top runners

FILE - In this June 1, 2013, file photo, Mary Cain, 17, right, reacts as coach Alberto Salazar tells her she has just broken the American high school 800-meter record during the Prefontaine Classic track and field meet in Eugene, Ore. Nike will investigate allegations of abuse by runner Mary Cain while she was a member of Alberto Salazar's training group. Cain joined the disbanded Nike Oregon Project run by Salazar in 2013, soon after competing in the 1,500-meter final at track and field's world championships when she was 17. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

Track and field is having its #MeToo moment.

Former teen running star Mary Cain’s account this week of body-shaming and alleged psychological abuse at the recently disbanded Nike Oregon Project is prompting other top athletes to come forward.

Distance runner Amy Yoder Begley said Friday she was told she “had the biggest butt on the starting line.” And Kara Goucher’s husband said the Olympian endured “disgusting” comments from coaches.

Nike says it’s investigating. But the cascade of allegations that have followed Oregon Project director Alberto Salazar’s four-year doping ban have some in the sport saying a day of reckoning was long overdue.

Dr. Kathryn Ackerman is medical director of the female athlete program at Boston Children’s Hospital. She says it’s important that the athletes’ stories get out.

William J. Kole, The Associated Press

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