WWI exhibit to display rarely seen artifacts at Lougheed House
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WWI exhibit to display rarely seen artifacts at Lougheed House

Last Updated Jan 18, 2019 at 6:45 am MST

Angus Goodleaf, a former soldier in the Canadian Expeditionary Force is pictured in this undated photo. (Lougheed House)
Summary

After the War: Coming Home and Fitting in at the End of the Great War, a collection of 45 WWI-era photos and artifacts.

The exhibit will be on display at Lougheed House from Jan. 23 to Mar. 17.

Admission prices Admission: $8.50 adult; $6.50 Seniors & Students, $5.00 children 6-12, $25.00 families.

CALGARY (660 NEWS) – A national traveling exhibit highlighting the challenges faced by Canadians post-WWI is coming to Lougheed House on January 23. After the War: Coming Home and Fitting in at the End of the Great War is a collection of approximately 45 WWI-era photos and rarely displayed artifacts from the Lougheed collection including Clarence Lougheed’s Canadian Army Service Corps ID bracelet; a cane presented in 1925 to Sir James Lougheed for his service in the Senate, and a WWI cigar box from Canada’s 14th Battalion.

“For many Canadians, the war did not simply end. They and their families struggled with its effects throughout their lives, and its social changes continue to have a presence in our world today,” said Caitlin Bailey, executive director of the Canadian Centre for the Great War. “Learning about past and present veterans not only honours their service, but it also helps us better understand the changes needed to become a more just society that takes care of all its members, especially the most vulnerable.”

Sir James Lougheed held various government posts between 1915 and 1921, including acting Minister of Militia and Defence, chairman of Canada’s Military Hospitals Commission, and Minister of the Soldiers’ Civil Re-establishment. The exhibition also includes the personal stories of Thomas Austin Bradford, his brother William Colborne Bradford, and Angus Goodleaf, all former soldiers of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. The exhibit examines the efforts made by Canadian society to support the over 600,000 veterans, and their families, who had fought, and died, for their country in the largest military engagement Canada had experienced.

The exhibit was created by the Canadian Centre for the Great War in Montreal and will be on display at Lougheed House from Jan. 23 to Mar. 17.

A free public event is taking place on Jan. 24 at 6-8 p.m.